Wine

Grilled Calamari Summer Salad

A hot summer’s evening, calls for a cool salad. Here’s a delicious calamari salad recipe that won’t take long to make, but will impress. Great with a glass of Arniston Bay.

Ingredients:

  • 400 gram Calamari rings
  • 1 Lemon
  • 100 gram Strawberries, halved
  • 200 gram Rocket leaves
  • 180 millilitre KNORR Creamy Ranch Salad Dressing
  • 1 Fresh mango
  • 15 millilitre Olive oil

Method:

  1. In a bowl place calamari and KNORR Creamy Ranch Salad Dressing
  2. Mix well
  3. Allow to stand while making the salad
  4. Rinse rocket leaves, dry and place in a serving dish
  5. Add mango and strawberries to the rocket
  6. On a high heat, heat oil in a griddle pan
  7. Add calamari, fry for 1-2 minutes or until no longer translucent
  8. Add calamari to the salad
  9. Squeeze fresh lemon juice over to taste
  10. Serve immediately

 

Recommended wine: The Arniston Bay Sauvignon Blanc will pair excellent with this salad.

Source: whatsfordinner.co.za

Wine Rack

What do you think of this beach house wine rack idea?

Sandal Coaster

The perfect coaster for a glass of Arniston Bay, don’t you think?

Wednesday’s wine quote…

‘A bottle of wine begs to be shared.’ -Clifton Fadiman

Christmas Specials

Great deals on Arniston Bay and Welmoed!

From Wed 12 Dec 2012 to Sat 12 Jan 2013.

 

Beat the Christmas rush and make your way to Welmoed Cellar Door where you can get unbelievable Christmas specials on wines and sparkling wines to make the Yuletide sizzle. This special offer starts on Wednesday, 12 December 2012 and ends on Saturday, 12 January 2013

 

Here is what you can look forward to:

WELMOED SPARKLING BRUT • 25% off if you buy a 6 bottle case – regular price R294, now R220.50 • 15% off per bottle if you buy less than 6 bottles – regular price R49, now R41.65 per bottle

 

ARNISTON BAY SPARKLING BRUT • 25% off if you buy a 6 bottle case – regular price R234, now R175.50 • 15% off per bottle if you buy less than 6 bottles – regular price R39, now R33.15

 

KUMKANI INFINITI MCC 2007 • 15% off if you buy a 6 bottle case – regular price R474, now R402.90 • 10% off if you buy less than 6 bottles – regular price R79, now R71.10 per bottle

 

ARNISTON BAY ROSÃ? 2012 • 25% off if you buy a 6 bottle case – regular price R198, now R148.50 per case

 

ARNISTON BAY CHENIN BLANC CHARDONNAY 2012 • 25% off if you buy a 6 bottle case – regular price R198, now R148.50 per case

 

ARNISTON BAY SAUVIGNON BLANC SEMILLON 2012 • 25% off if you buy a 6 bottle case – regular price R198, now R148.50 per case

 

Unfortunately we can’t reserve any stock for customers, everything is sold on a first come, first served basis. Prices include VAT.

 

So get on down to the cellar! We hope to spot you there. For any queries, contact the Welmoed Cellar Door on 021 881 8062. For directions to Cellar Door, click here.

 

 

 

Not for sale to persons under the age of 18. Normal staff and partner discounts do not apply on specials.

Please enjoy our products responsibly – not for sale to persons under legal drinking age

Lemon Meringue Pie

For a lovely after dinner treat, try this easy to make lemon meringue pie. Great flavours to pair excellent with a glass of Arniston Bay.

Ingredients:

1 packet Tennis biscuits 1 tin condensed milk 2 eggs 125ml (½ cup) lemon juice 150g margarine (or butter) ¼ cup castor sugar

Method:
  1. Melt the margarine.
  2. Crush the Tennis biscuits until finely crumbled and add the margarine.
  3. Press into pie dish and place in the fridge.
  4. Pour condensed milk into a mixing bowl.
  5. Separate the eggs and add the yolks to the condensed milk and stir till well blended.
  6. Add lemon juice and stir until it thickens.
  7. Pour over the biscuit crust.
  8. Combine the egg whites and castor sugar and beat until stiff (+/-15 minutes).
  9. Pour it over the lemon curd.
  10. Bake at 140°C for 30 – 40 minutes.

 

Recommended wine: Try this dessert with a glass of Arniston Bay Chenin Blanc Chardonnay.

Source: justeasyrecipes

Greek Chicken Feta Bake

Here’s a lovely chicken and feta bake recipe that is very easy to make, but will impress all of the taste buds. Enjoy with a glass of Arniston Bay.

Ingredients
  • 500 gram Baby potatoes, halved
  • 6 Small chicken thighs on the bone, skin on
  • 1 sachet KNORR Brown Onion Gravy
  • 1 teaspoon Paprika
  • 2 Red onions, cut into eighths
  • 1 Red pepper, cut into strips
  • 1 Yellow pepper, cut into strips
  • 3 Garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 tablespoon Olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon Robertsons Origanum
  • Robertsons Salt and Pepper
  • 200 gram Tin diced tomatoes
  • 12 Black olives
  • Chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 250 millilitre Feta cheese, crumbled
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 200°C.
  2. In a large pan of boiling water cook potatoes for 10 minutes.
  3. Drain and set aside to cool.
  4. Place chicken in a large baking dish.
  5. Sprinkle with KNORR Brown Onion Gravy and paprika.
  6. Add onions, peppers, garlic and potatoes.
  7. Drizzle with oil, sprinkle with origanum and season well.
  8. Bake for 30 minutes.
  9. Add tomatoes and olives, basting chicken with the juices.
  10. Cook for 15 more minutes.
  11. Serve sprinkled with parsley and feta cheese.

 

Recommended wine: Try the Arniston Bay Shiraz Merlot with this dish.

Source: whatsfordinner

Beach Wine

Some beach wine décor… Do you like it?

Cottage Pie

This excellent comfort food, also known as Shepherd’s Pie, will brighten up any dinner. It’s quick and easy to make, but delicious in taste.

Ingredients:

6 medium potatoes – peeled (and milk and butter for mash) 500g lean mince 1 onion, chopped 2 tomatoes, chopped 1 cup brown mushrooms, sliced 1 beef stock cube ¼ cup water 1 tbsp sunflower oil for frying 1 tbsp garlic and lemon mix 3-4 tbsp tomato paste ½ tsp thyme ½ tsp oregano ½ tsp rosemary 1 tsp salt ½ cup grated cheese to sprinkle on top of mash

Method:
  1. Peel the potatoes, slice in half and boil until soft.
  2. Fry the onion in the cooking oil until soft.
  3. Add the mince, garlic & lemon mix, stock cube and water to the onions.
  4. Once the mince is sealed and has a nice brown colour to it, add the mushrooms, tomatoes, tomato paste, salt, rosemary, thyme and oregano.
  5. Mix together well.
  6. Allow to simmer for 5-10 minutes.
  7. Once everything is cooked, add the mixture to a round casserole dish.
  8. Mash the potatoes, add some milk and butter to create a soft even consistency (it should not be runny).
  9. Now spread the mash potato evenly over the mince mixture and then sprinkle with cheese (this is optional but tastes delicious!).
  10. Place the dish under the grill for a few minutes and allow cheese to melt and turn golden brown and slightly.

Recommended wine: For great results, try the Arniston Bay Merlot with this dish.

Source: justeasyrecipes

The ultimate relaxing gadget for a bath.

A book holder and a place to put your glass of Arniston Bay…

Don’t know where to buy it, but what do you think?

Beef Waterfall Salad

Here’s a lovely Thailand inspired salad recipe to try for a relaxed lunch or dinner. Perfect with a glass of Arniston Bay.

Ingredients:

1-2 sirloin steaks

Ingredients – marinade:

2 tbsp oyster sauce 2 tbsp soy sauce 1 tbsp lime or lemon juice 2 tbsp brown sugar

Ingredients – salad:

1 large bowl lettuce leaves 1 cup bean sprouts Handful of fresh mint or basil leaves, lightly chopped or torn 1 cup fresh coriander 1 cup fresh papaya, cubed 1 cup cherry tomatoes, left whole or sliced in half

Ingredients – dressing:

2 tbsp fish sauce 3 tbsp lime or lemon juice 1 ½ tbsp soy sauce ½ tsp cayenne pepper 1 tsp brown sugar 2 tbsp ground peanuts

Method:
  1. Mix the marinade ingredients together in a bowl.
  2. Pour the marinade over the steaks.
  3. Place the steaks in the fridge to marinate for 30 min to an hour.
  4. Mix all salad dressing ingredients together in a mixing bowl.
  5. Prepare and mix all your salad ingredients.
  6. Grill the steak until rare to medium rare.
  7. While steak is cooking, toss the salad with the salad dressing.
  8. Serve the salad into individual portions.
  9. Slice the steak as thinly as you can.
  10. Top each portion with a generous amount of sliced sirloin and serve immediately.

 

Recommended wine: Try the Arniston Bay Rosé with this salad.

Source: justeasyrecipes

True Words

James Joyce said some true words to take us to an relaxing weekend…

‘What is better than to sit at the end of the day and drink wine with friends.’

-James Joyce

Soufflé-topped pasta bake

For a great start of the week dinner, try this delicious soufflé-topped pasta bake. All the fantastic flavours will certainly delight and impress.

 

Ingredients:

  • 30 g dried porcini mushrooms
  • 150 ml boiling water
  • 115 g small pasta shapes
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 30 g plain flour
  • 240 ml semi-skimmed milk
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 can sweetcorn, about 340 g, drained
  • 2 tbsp freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • salt and pepper

 

Method:

Preheat the oven to 190°C. Place the dried porcini mushrooms in a small bowl and pour in the boiling water. Cover and leave to soak for 15 minutes.

While the mushrooms are soaking, cook the pasta shapes in boiling water for 10–12 minutes, or according to the packet instructions, until al dente. Drain the pasta well.

Drain the mushrooms, reserving the liquid, and chop them finely. Heat the oil in a heavy-based saucepan and fry the onion, garlic and mushrooms for 4 minutes or until the onion is softened but not browned. Sprinkle over the flour and stir in well, then gradually pour in the milk, stirring. Bring to the boil, stirring constantly, and simmer until thickened. Add seasoning to taste.

Pour half the sauce into a bowl. Stir in the egg yolks and set aside. Add the reserved mushroom liquid to the sauce left in the pan, then stir in the cooked pasta, parsley and sweetcorn. Turn this mixture into a greased 1.4 litre (2 1/2 pint) ovenproof dish.

Whisk the egg whites until they stand in stiff peaks. Stir 2 spoonfuls of the whisked whites into the sauce in the bowl to lighten it, then, using a large metal spoon, carefully fold in the remaining whites.

Spoon the egg white mixture over the pasta mixture and spread it out gently to the edge of the dish. Sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese and bake for 25 minutes or until puffed up and golden. Serve immediately, before the souffléed topping collapses.

 

Recommended wine: The Arniston Bay Sauvignon Blanc will pair lovely with this dish.

Source: allrecipes

Spiced Butternut Squash Soup

This delectable butternut squash soup will surely be an instant favourite. With added richness due to the cream, it’s perfect for a lovely relaxed dinner.

 

Ingredients:

  • 1.5kg butternut squash, halved and seeded
  • 50g butter
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 1 leek, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 1L chicken stock
  • 2 large potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground ginger
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 125ml sherry
  • 125ml double cream
  • 125ml milk
  • 125ml cup soured cream (optional)

Preparation method:

Preheat the oven to 190 C. Pour a small layer of water in a baking dish, or a swiss roll tin. Place the squash halves cut side down on the dish. Bake for about 40 minutes, or until a fork can easily pierce the flesh. Cool slightly, then remove the peel. Set aside.

Melt the butter in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion, leek and garlic, and saute for a few minutes, until tender. Pour the chicken stock into the pot. Add the potatoes, and bring to the boil. Cook for about 20 minutes, or until soft. Add the squash, and mash with the potatoes until chunks are small. Use an immersion hand blender to puree the soup, or transfer to a blender or food processor in batches, and puree until smooth. Return to the pot.

 

Recommended wine: Try the Arniston Bay Sauvignon Blanc with this meal.

Source: allrecipes

A recipe for relaxation…

Chicken Wraps

Try these great chicken wraps for a relaxed, but decadent treat. It’s ideal for a quiet night in, or with some company.

 

To view this recipe, go to… simply-delicious

 

Arniston Bay Chenin Blanc Chardonnay 2011

Today’s featured wine is the Arniston Bay Chenin Blanc Chardonnay 2011.

 

Zestful pineapple and ripe melon flavours on the nose following through to a limy full middle palate finishing in crisp freshness.

 

Read more… http://tinyurl.com/d4vzh8u

Tuna and Ratatouille Pasta

Here’s a great tasting weeknight recipe idea, that quick and easy to make so you can sit back and relax with a glass of Arniston Bay.

 

Ingredients

  • 15 millilitre oil
  • 1 Onion, chopped
  • 250 gram Courgettes, sliced
  • 1 Red pepper, diced
  • 1 Sachet KNORR Tuna Mate Cheddar-Melt
  • 250 millilitre Milk
  • 800 millilitre hot water
  • 2 Tins tuna, in brine
Instructions
  1. In a large saucepan, fry the onion, courgettes and peppers in the oil for 3 min.
  2. Add the sachet of Seasoning Spice blend with 250 ml cold milk add 800 ml hot water to the vegetables in the pot.
  3. Add the tuna and pasta and bring to the boil, stirring occasionally.
  4. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 min, stirring occasionally.

 

Recommended wine: For great results, try the Arniston Bay Sauvignon Blanc Semillon with this meal.

Source: whatsfordinner

Arniston Bay Rosé

Today’s featured wine is the amazing Arniston Bay Rosé 2011.

 

Lively strawberry and violet aromas combine with the fresh fruity taste to yield a light easy drinking wine.

 

Serve well chilled on its own or with salads and open sandwiches.

 

Read more… http://tinyurl.com/cxh9ofc

 

Market Day Wine Sale

It’s that time again, the time for delicious wine at a mere fraction of the price.

The company of winepeopleTM’s famous Market Day Sale is happening at Welmoed Wine Estate from the 29th of August to the 4th  of September 2012.

Remember it is first come first serve, so be that early bird and catch the wine-worm!

Directions to Welmoed Wine Estate.

Here is the list of wines to look forward to. Purchases are only by the case.

Barrel Storage

Great wine barrel decorative/storage idea… What do you think?

The charismatic Camembert

The charismatic Camembert is a soft, creamy, surface-ripened cow’s milk cheese. First production of this cheese was in the late 18th century at Camembert, Normandy in northern France.

 

Each cheese surface is sprayed with an aqueous suspension of the mould Penicillium camemberti and then left to ripen for at least three weeks.

A wonderful wine to pair with camembert is a Chardonnay Blanc and a great example is the Arniston Bay Chardonnay 2012.

 

Fermented in stainless steel tanks until dry. Intensely fruity with good acidity and some toasty spicy complexity from well judged oak. Really attractive with lots of character and elegance.

 

Read more on this wine… arniston-bay

Of Brie and Wine

The brilliant Brie is a soft cow’s cheese named after Brie, the French region from which it originated.

 

Its colour scheme is pale, with a slight greyish tinge under a rind of white mould. The whitish mouldy rind is typically eaten, the flavour quality of which depends largely upon the ingredients used and its manufacturing environment.

 

A great wine to pair with Brie is a Chardonnay and the lovely Arniston Bay Chardonnay 2012 will perfectly pair with this remarkable cheese.

 

An urban picnic gadget…

Just add Arniston Bay and taste the sunshine.

Wine and the City

What do you think of this Sex and the City themed wine glass? Ideal for a Miranda Merlot, or a Carrie Cabernet… or just a glass of Arniston Bay.

Have a lovely Women’s Day tomorrow.

The smell of chocolate and wine

Maybe the world’s most natural companion, both wine and chocolate have complex flavours and notes. They have similar components and nuances and thus making the perfect pair. Here are some hints and tips to pair these two together:

 

How to team up the pair:

Examine the attributes of the chocolate, and follow the same steps as you would in a classic chocolate tasting. That includes noting the aroma, listening for the snap when you break it and checking the shine and glossiness. Before tasting it, though, take the same notice of the wine.

Swirl the wine in the glass: be aware of the colour and the viscosity.

Sniff the wine and note the bouquet and flavour components.

Sip the wine; let it fill your mouth. Notice the wine’s complexity, which flavours come to mind. Now take a small bite of the chocolate, let it sit on your tongue. When it just begins to melt, sip the wine again and swirl together with the chocolate.

 

Flavours to expect:

Just like in a chocolate or wine tasting, the flavours are released in stages. The first notes should be filled with fruity acidity (from the grapes in the wine, and the cacao beans in the chocolate). Watch the flavours that unfold in this middle stage, and look for a sweetness phase. The finish should be identified by tannins, flavour notes common to both wine and chocolate.

Many of the same flavour notes you experienced in your chocolate tasting will emerge during the pairings. You’ll observe fruity, nutty, spicy and/or woody notes. You may even detect roasted flavours specifically identifiable with chocolate.

Pair lighter chocolates with lighter wines; darker chocolates with full-bodied wines. Go from light to dark in your tasting session, starting with milk or lower percentage cacao chocolates and their corresponding wines.

 

Pairing for dark, bittersweet and semisweet chocolate:

  • Zinfandel
  • Syrah
  • Tawny Port
  • Cognac

If you’re looking to pair up Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, or Sangiovese reds, they need to be well-aged to suitably pair with darker chocolates.

 

Pairings for milk chocolate:

  • Merlot
  • Riesling
  • Sauvignon Blanc
  • Dessert wines

 

Arniston Bay has a wide variety of wine perfect for all your pairing needs.

Source: allchocolate

What do you think of this unconventional wine glass?

Bath and Wine

What do you think about this great bath time gadget?

So, sit back and relax with a book and a glass of Arniston Bay… recharging the soul.

Serving Triple Tips

Wine can do many things, it will complement the food, make a table look more elegant and liven up an occasion.

 

But many people find it confusing. There are too many choices, it requires a special tool to open, and there’s the whole culture around wine supposedly dictating what goes with which food and what’s cool to drink.

 

Here’s a quick primer on how to incorporate wine into your social events without hassles and embarrassment, and what basic items you need to present your drink perfectly.

 

The No. 1 rule is drink what you think tastes good, and have a couple of other offerings available that others might like.  Your palate is about as individual as your fingerprints. What you like, someone else might avoid and vice versa, but that doesn’t mean the wine is bad. So serve a couple of wines and keep your bases covered.

 

Secondly, serve it in decent glasses.  The shape of the glass really can affect the taste of a wine.  It has to do with how the bowl of the glass channels the aroma – which is a big component of taste – to your nose.  This is what wine lovers refer to when they are talking about the bouquet of a wine. Use a clear glass so you can see the wine. It’s worth the second or two to raise the stem toward light and just take a moment to appreciate the colour.

 

Next, get a good corkscrew. A flimsy old corkscrew can be a hassle and an embarrassment.  Corkscrews are really not expensive and, ideally, you should have more than one in your home.

 

Now all you need is wine. I recommend the fantastic Arniston Bay Bush Vine Pinotage is a great start.

It’s the Weekend

If you can’t go to the beach this weekend, bring the beach to you. Escape to Arniston Bay with our great Chardonnay.

Wine Cellar

A room with a sea view and wine, can it get any better?

Wine and sunsets: the perfect pair.

Isn’t this a lovely pic?

The Merlot Marvel

It’s one of the most popular cultivars that have stood the test of time. Let’s take a quick look into the wonderful Merlot.

Merlot is a wonderful grape which gives winemakers the possibility to create lovely single cultivar wines as well as balanced, blended master pieces.

Merlot is one of the world’s most planted grapes and it is cultivated in all the major wine producing countries.

Merlot grapes are primarily use, to make the lone standing Merlot wine. However, because of its softness and fruitiness, it is also found in many blended wines and is used to soften the Cabernet Sauvignon red wine. Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon are the two main cultivars in the so-called Bordeaux blends.

Merlot ripens earlier in the season than its cousin, Cabernet Sauvignon, so it can be sold earlier. It is softer and fruitier than the Cabernet, yet produces many of the same aromas and textures. This makes it more desirable to many wine drinkers.

South Africa has a rich red wine tradition and the Arniston Bay Merlot is one of these great wines. With dark cherry and plum nose with a spicy palate, it’s well balanced ripe fruit, with a persistent soft tannin finish.

 

Source: ehow.com

The Difference between Syrah and Shiraz

There have been many questions surrounding this. Some wonder if they are the same, just different pronunciations, or are they completely different in all aspects. So the question begs: “What is the difference between Shiraz and Syrah?”

 

They are In fact, one and the same grape. No one really knows why the grape named Syrah in France was renamed Shiraz in Australia, possibly after the famed city in Iran.

 

The reason Australians (and New World Wines) retained the name is probably a bit for tradition and a lot for marketing, although they may not have intended to create so much confusion among wine drinkers.

 

There are some wine critics who believe that there is a difference in wines labelled Shiraz often tastes different than those labelled as Syrah. Some New World Shiraz wines are frequently big, ripe and high in alcohol while in France Syrahs are often a bit austere, with higher tannins, and are better for aging. So the name difference can be useful, but this is certainly not always the case. And now some New World wines are bottling their wines as Syrah and some French as Shiraz, so the field is getting a lot less clear.

A great traditional South African Shiraz is the Arniston Bay Shiraz. A full bodied wine, with intense dark colour, subtle smoky and pepper spice nose with strong full mid-palate and good tannin structure.

 

Read more on… easyfoodandwinel

Beach Glasses

Here are some interesting beach wine glasses. What do you think, pretty or not?

Picnic Set

This looks like a fantastic gadget for an urban or beach picnic. What do you think about this picnic set?

Why wine and cheese go together

If you’re looking for something to go with wine, it will often be cheese. And if you’re looking for something to go with cheese, then it will definitely be wine. At dinner parties around the world, when you’ve exhausted the menu and are looking for something to nibble on, the wine and cheese pairing will never disappoint. But why do wine and cheese go so well together? Is it simply that they please our taste buds, or is there a more scientific reason for this match made in heaven?

 

Tannin – What Is It?

Actually, both are true. Most wine and cheese buffs will tell you that this food and beverage combo goes together because of the tannin. Whether they can explain it any more than that is unlikely, as most laymen don’t know the science behind this answer and don’t really know what tannins are.

Tannins are natural organic compounds usually found in grape skins as well as seeds and stems. They’re great antioxidants and wonderful preservatives, which is part of the reason they are added to wine. When the wine is being aged in oak barrels, tannins are added for structure and texture – and preservation.

Winemakers use tannin to give wines the distinctive flavors we recognize. Variations in the process result in variations in the taste, so there’s fine control over the bottle of wine we finally get to drink. Depending on the desired flavor, vintners can squeeze the grapes to remove the juice and ensure that little tannin is released. Alternatively, they can crush the grapes to release more tannin, as they do with red wine.

When there’s a concentrated amount of tannin, it can cause the mouth to pucker and result in a bitter aftertaste at the back of the mouth. That’s known as tannic, which is also the natural sediment, found at the bottom of a wine bottle.

The amount of tannin also affects when a wine is drinkable. Red wine with only a little tannin is drunk at a young age. In contrast, a wine that improves with age will have plenty of tannin, but the ageing process will soften the taste and reduce any bitter aftertaste.

Tannins are also found in tea, resulting in the chalky, dry taste that hits the back of your mouth when you drink strong tea. And that’s why the English put milk in tea – to soften the taste of the tannins.

 

The Wine and Cheese Pairing                                             

So what does all this have to do with wine and cheese? It’s this. Scientists have found that high fat, high protein foods balance the taste of tannin. That makes cheese the perfect food to go with wine. Of course, it doesn’t stop there, because there is always the question of which wine goes with which cheese, a hotly debated topic. After decades of testing, and countless “experts” brainstorming and have-a-go wine buffs drinking expensive Merlot, there are mile-long lists on the internet that claim to have the answer. And if you have a favorite wine or cheese, a quick Google search will help you find a good complement to add to your shopping list before your dinner party.

 

Arniston Bay has a wide range of wines which pairs well with numerous delicious cheeses.

Market Day Wine Sale

It’s almost that time again, the time for delicious wine at a mere fraction of the price.

The company of winepeopleTM’s famous Market Day Sale is happening at Welmoed Wine Estate from the 28th of May to the 3rd  of June 2012.

Remember it is first come first serve, so be that early bird and catch the wine-worm!

Directions to Welmoed Wine Estate.

Here is the list of wines to look forward to. Purchases are only by the case.

Wine Transportation

Here’s an innovative way to transport your wine to a picnic.

A Few Simple Ways to Make Your Wine Taste Better

With so many lovely wines, one needs to appreciate them to the fullest. There are plenty factors that can alter the taste of a wine. So, here are a few tips to help optimize the taste of your wine…

 (1) Serve the wine at the right temperature

Though it is common wisdom that red wines are to be served at room temperature and white wines chilled, this will not give you the best tasting wine.

A bottle of wine opens up and releases its richest bouquet of aromas at a particular temperature. This particular temperature differs for each wine, depending on the grape variety and region.

Typical temperature for storing red wine ranges from 11°C-18°C, and 7°C-10°C for white wines. Generally speaking, serve more intense, fuller-bodied wines at higher temperature. For best wine tasting, do refer to a serving temperature by grape variety chart.

(2) Aerate or breathe the wine:

Aeration can make younger wines more balanced and smoother by rounding their tannins. In addition, airing helps get rid of bottle stinks — the unpleasant odor that emerges when the bottle is opened.

Uncorking a bottle of wine and letting it sit for an hour is surely the worst way to aerate the wine. Not only must you wait an hour to drink the wine, but also the method is ineffective. Even after many hours, the narrow bottleneck still prevents much air from opening up the wine.

Most wine lovers use a decanter, a glass pitcher with a wide opening. The increased surface area allows faster aeration. If you don’t want to invest in a decanter, swirling the wine in the glass helps aerate it.

The key to aeration is timing! A young, intense, tannic red might need up to 2 hours to open up. An hour is great for a mature, full bodied, complex red. As for aged wines (older than 15 years), they are highly volatile. Do not aerate them for more than minutes!

Read more… 100bestwines.com

Marvelous Merlot

Some researchers believe that Merlot is an offspring of Cabernet Franc and is a sibling of Carménère and Cabernet Sauvignon. The earliest recorded mention of Merlot was in the notes of a local Bordeaux official who in 1784 labeled wine made from the grape in the Libournais region as one of the area’s best. The name comes from the Occitan word “merlot”, which means “young blackbird.”

Here is South Africa, we have a tremendous amount of excellent merlot. Wine production here dates back to 1659. One of these outstanding wines is the Arniston Bay Merlot with its Dark cherry and plum nose and spicy palate.

Read more of the Arniston Bay Merlot at… http://tinyurl.com/c69zzj8

Balsamic lamb and beetroot salad

When at the beach or a picnic, you want to enjoy a light meal to go with the relaxing atmosphere. Not only is this recipe light and healthy, but also beautiful in taste. A must for those much needed getaways…

Ingredients

  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 3 (400g) lamb leg steaks, trimmed
  • olive oil cooking spray
  • 80g baby rocket
  • 1 medium red pepper, chopped
  • 1 small red onion, halved, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup roughly chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 425g can baby beets, drained, halved
  • 60g feta cheese, crumbled

Method

  1. Combine garlic and 2 tablespoons vinegar in a shallow glass or ceramic dish. Add lamb. Season with salt and pepper. Turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 15 minutes to allow flavours to develop.
  2. Heat a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Spray lamb with oil. Cook for 3 minutes each side for medium or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a plate. Cover with foil to keep warm.
  3. Combine rocket, red pepper, onion, parsley, baby beets and remaining vinegar in a large bowl.
  4. Cut lamb into 1cm-thick slices. Place rocket mixture on a serving plate. Top with lamb slices and feta. Serve.

 

Recommended wine: The versatile Arniston Bay Rosé will be the perfect wine with this dish.

 

Source: taste.com

 

 

A few Tips for Wine Newbies

Here are just a few basic pointers to help you along your wine way:

 

Don’t fill your cellar with the wines you like at the moment. The temptation may be strong to buy cases and half-cases, but your tastes will change.

 

Attend as many tastings as you can. Taste and learn. But remember to spit!

 

Remember to take the opinions and advice of wine ‘experts’ with a pinch of salt. If any wine ‘expert’ is worth listening to, they’ll be humble enough to acknowledge that they are fallible and that their expertise can by necessity only cover certain areas.

 

Get good advice on what to try, either from a merchant who you trust, or from a critic whose palate seems to match with yours.

 

Keep notes on all the wines you try. At first you may not be very sure of what you are writing, but gradually your confidence will grow. It is also interesting to see how your perception of certain wines changes with experience!

 

Read as much as you can. There are many excellent reference works around.

 

If you get the chance, visit the wine country. There is nothing like visiting the vineyards where the grapes are grown — putting wine in its natural context — to bring a wine to life.

 

Finally, join an online wine discussion forum. Lurk for a while at first to get a feeling for the place, and then join in.

 

The most important wine tip is to enjoy the company, the setting and of course – the wine!

Arniston Bay has a wide range of wines which suites every palate and is ideal for all wine lovers.

 

Source: wineanorak

Chilling your Wine Secrets

Every now and again, friends pop in for an unexpected visit. Being unprepared, you might end up in the situation that you have no chilled wine. The last thing you want is to have to wait a while. So, here are a few tips on how to quickly chill your wine to that perfect temperature…

1. How to chill wine in six minutes: Simply place the wine bottle into an ice bucket and fill with ice, water and a handful of salt. The salt is important as it will help break down the ice, which will make the water colder, faster.

2. Keep an empty wine bottle or a decanter in the freezer. When needing a quick chill, transfer the wine that needs chilled into the frozen vessel. The wine will be ready to drink in about ten minutes.

3. Although there are plenty of naysayers who believe that putting a bottle of wine in the freezer will damage its integrity, those who are daring (and in need of quick results) might choose to do so. But don’t leave it in any longer than 15 minutes. It will chill even faster if you wrap a wet paper towel or hand towel around it before placing it in the freezer.

4. Purchase an “ice jacket” (a gel-filled sleeve) that you keep in the freezer. Wrap it around the wine bottle for approximately ten minutes. A benefit to using this method is that you won’t have to worry about forgetting how long you left it on ice or in the freezer.

5. Wet a hand towel, wrap it around the wine bottle and put it in the refrigerator to chill. This method will take a little longer, but you won’t have to worry about damaging its integrity.

 

So next time you don’t have to stress, but just enjoy the spontaneous company.

 

Recommended wineArniston Bay Chenin Blanc Chardonnay is a great wine to serve chilled.

Source: luxist.com

 

 

 

Escape to Arniston Bay

At Arniston mother nature has ensured that you can ‘get away from it all’. Whether you enjoy sun tanning on unspoilt white beaches, watching whales breaching in the bay or more active pursuits such as hiking or exploring the countryside, Arniston has something to offer everyone.

Arniston Bay Wines are inspired by the sunny skies and pristine beaches of this quaint fishing village. This unpretentious wine is ideal for those carefree, alfresco dining or easy drinking wine occasions – anywhere, anytime.

The range has a multitude of offerings ranging from easy-drinking entry level wines to more sophisticated wines for discerning palates.

Accessible and unconventional, Arniston Bay wines have become the favourite among contemporary wine lovers. Arniston Bay provides a range of lifestyle wines for every occasion, whether socializing with friends or just enjoying a laid-back afternoon on your own.

Tips on Cooking with Wine

The reason for cooking with wine is to intensify and enhance the flavour of food. Wine is known to release flavors in many foods that otherwise would not be experienced.

 

Just be careful not to use too much wine in the beginning, as the flavour could overpower your dish. The first step is to try a small amount of wine so the flavors will blend and not become too overpowering. As you’re cooking, try sampling your dish and add as needed.

Here are a few basic pointers for wine and dine

 

  •  When a recipe calls for water, replace the water with a favorite wine.

 

  •  Stir in 1 to 2 tablespoons of a full-bodied red into brown gravy. Let simmer to create rich brown gravy for red meat.

 

  •  Mix wine with your favourite oil to baste meat and poultry.

 

  •  For meat dishes calling for wine, first heat the wine. Do not boil the wine, this will loose the flavour.

 

  • Adding cold wine tends to make meat tough, while warm wine helps tenderize it.

 

  • Dry red wines (like the Arniston Bay Merlot) have better chemistry with heavier red meats.

 

  • Serve the same wine with dinner that you cooked with, as they will balance each other. If you prefer to use a fine wine during dinner, try to stay within the same wine family.

 

Cooking with wine can be great and drinking a glass while you prepare the food should also go down well.

 

 

winedefinitions.com

 

Market Day Wine Sale

It’s almost that time again, the time for delicious wine at a mere fraction of the price.

The company of winepeopleTM ‘s famous Market Day Sale is happening at Welmoed Wine Estate from the 27th of February to the 4th of March.

 

Remember it is first come first serve, so be that early bird and catch the wine-worm!

 

Directions to Welmoed Wine Estate.

 

Here is the list of wines to look forward to. Purchases are only by the case.

Winemaker’s quality control tasting

Our winemaker, Abraham de Villiers, busy with a quality control tasting before bottling.

The Romance of Wine and Chocolate

In the romantic month that is upon us, it’s essential to embrace our senses. Walking through a market, we are overwhelmed by the smell of flowers, brand new teddy –bears and helium filled plastic hearts.

 

How to truly appreciate ones senses, is to pair the two most important things in life – Wine and Chocolate. Some might think the pairing should be handled only by experts, but it’s easy and fun to do it yourself.

 

So, if you want a quick escape from this month’s busy festivities and do a wine and chocolate pairing from the comfort of your own home, here’s what you do.

Firstly keep in mind, you won’t necessarily find the perfect matches straight away, but that’s the best part. You have to keep on experimenting, which means more wine and chocolate.  A general tip is to match lighter chocolate with lighter-bodied wines and the stronger the chocolate, go with a more full-bodied wine.

 

Here are a few simple hints to get you started.

 

Try a Sherry with a nice buttery white chocolate.

 

A Pinot Noir or the medium bodied Arniston Bay Merlot will compliment milk chocolate, a creamy mousse or even a chocolate accented cheesecake.

 

Muscats do wonders with mild milk chocolates.

The Arnsiton Bay Cabernet Sauvignon Arnsiton Bay Cabernet Sauvignon is a marvelous match with dark chocolate.

To end things off, appreciate a well aged Port with a dark chocolate dessert or a truffle.

That’s the basics. So invite someone over, get creative and enjoy your pallet.

 

Festive season traps

The holiday looms, and so does Christmas. All you want to do is chill out after what’s been a hard year. But that’s not always the easiest thing to do – you know the bit about life being “the thing that happens while you’re making other plans”.

For some, chilling out may mean booking a camping site 20 km from the nearest village a year in advance. Or going into a Trappist monastery until the festive season is over.

But most people will have a more sociable time – either at home, visiting relatives, or at the seaside somewhere. Who knows, you might need to get back to the office in January to get some rest. In order to get the most out of your break , women24.com suggest that you try and avoid the following festive season stressors.

Guests galore. You have a big house, and over Christmas it fills up with aunties, grannies, nieces, uncles – you name it. Instead of looking after four people, you are now looking after twelve. This is no holiday for you, as you are the unofficial entertainment committee, the caterer, the conflict resolution specialist, and the local cleaner. If you live in a popular destination, you might have to put your foot down. Or at least put together a duty roster for the cooking and the cleaning. And, for heaven’s sake, don’t feel you have to be the unofficial tour guide. Take a day or two off and let the guests entertain themselves.

Feeding frenzy. Food, food, food. It’s all over during the Christmas season and it’s lying in wait for you everywhere, and we’re not talking about celery sticks either. It’s chips, cakes, cheese snacks, chocolates, to name but a few. And, after all, you’re on holiday. So why not? That’s fine, but just don’t get into a new habit. Most people end the festive season with quite a few kilos that were not there in November. Don’t become a festive season fatty.

Booze bonanza. From the office party to friends’ homes, to family barbecues – booze is no stranger to the festive season. And often, other people are paying for it. By all means have a beer or two, if you’re not driving, but don’t binge on booze. Drinking too much is something that carries its own punishment with it, a bit like eating that second helping of hot Indian curry. And do remember, that everyone likes you to have a drink or two, but nobody likes having a social embarrassment at their parties. Fall down drunk, or insult one of the other guests, and you can be sure you’ll be off the party list. Forever.

I’m so lonely. Some people wish everything could be a little quieter. Others wish for a break from the peace and quiet and they dream of the phone ringing or a horde of guests arriving. The secret is to arrange a few things in advance. Invite people for supper, get a friend to go with you to a movie, or organise a day or two away in a different place. Don’t wait until the festive season is upon you before doing something about your social calendar. It’s not going to happen by itself.

Exercise inertia. Most people give their exercise regimes a break during the festive season. It is, after all, the end of the year. Problem is, many people overindulge completely on the food front at the same time, and coupled with a fortnight of couch-potato-ism, your waistline might be expanding at the rate of knots. Go for a walk with the family, run along the beach, play volleyball. Do anything to burn up those extra calories. And get back into it early in the new year.

Credit card crisis. The last of the Big Spenders. If that describes you in the shopping centre with your Christmas bonus and your credit card, you’re obviously a sucker for all those Christmas ads. And you’re going to be stony broke in January, and depressed in February when the credit card statements start arriving. Point is that you can probably buy just as nice a present for R100 as you can for R200, or R400. You just need to plan it well. It’s the thought that counts, not the size of the present.

Sunburn stress. The sun in the southern hemisphere is vicious , and skin cancer is a real danger. And remember that the damage is cumulative. Burning yourself to a crisp or having a whimpering and sunburnt child on your hands, is no way to spend Christmas. Speak to your pharmacist and get a high-factor sunblock before you head for the beach. And speaking of the beach – watch out for bluebottles or pieces of broken glass in the sand.

Crowd control. Think of Christmas, and what many people see are teeming masses of people in a shopping centre, all of them with a mission, and accompanied by at least two unwilling and exhausted kids. It can be avoided – do your gift shopping in November and do a bulk grocery shop before 18 December. Milling crowds can be exhausting, and elicit everything but the Christmas spirit in you. In fact, it can bring on a bout of trolley rage.

Gift of the grab. Frantic last-minute gift-buying is a killer – not only don’t you get what you are looking for, you also spend a fortune on it. Rather than give unwanted and expensive presents, go for gift vouchers – at least people will appreciate them, even if they are not the most personal of offerings.

Family fest. Family. You get them, you don’t choose them. And never is it more obvious than at Christmas time when Uncle Freddy is holding forth on all his achievements, or Aunt Doris is slurring after her third beer. Or your cousin’s kids are running around screaming, chasing your poor cats. Then there are the endless questions about when you are going to tie the knot, have babies etc. Family get-togethers seldom do much for your self-esteem. Just repeat the mantra, “It will soon be over for another year.”

Arniston Bay has a wide wine range that will suit any palate for all the festive season occasions.

Source: women24.com

 

 

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